Weekly Feature



2018-07-12 / Editorial

Out of the Past

25 Years Ago July 15, 1993


WEST SENECA EAST SENIOR HIGH CONSTRUCTION — As West Seneca’s population continued to grow through the 1950s and 1960s, the need for school expansion resulted in construction of a new high school. Built by contractor Wright and Kremers, work began in 1968. The first class to complete a full year of study there was the class of 1971. The site is shown in August 1968. 
Photo and caption courtesy of Jim Pace, West Seneca town historian WEST SENECA EAST SENIOR HIGH CONSTRUCTION — As West Seneca’s population continued to grow through the 1950s and 1960s, the need for school expansion resulted in construction of a new high school. Built by contractor Wright and Kremers, work began in 1968. The first class to complete a full year of study there was the class of 1971. The site is shown in August 1968. Photo and caption courtesy of Jim Pace, West Seneca town historian • The search for a new West Seneca police chief came to an end Monday night as John Miskovski, a former lieutenant with the department, was sworn in by Town Clerk Patricia Wisniewski in town hall. Miskovski was surrounded by his family as he was officially named to succeed retired chief Bruce Manning by the Town Board, which was unanimous in its decision. Miskovski will start his reign as chief with a $52,000 annual salary.

• Residents of Emporium Drive in West Seneca aren’t happy about a planned expansion of the New York State Thruway between exits 53 and 54. They are even less pleased with the lack of concrete sound barriers planned between the road and their homes. “The neighborhood really doesn’t want another two lanes,” said Robert Rappold of 231 Emporium. “Six lanes is so noisy and so dirty now. We close our front windows now so that the dirt doesn’t blow in our house.” Rappold was one of more than 100 people who attended a public hearing on the expansion last Wednesday at Winchester Elementary School, hosted by Leonard DePrima of the New York Thruway Authority. Councilwoman Barbara Rudnicki, who also attended the hastily called gathering, said DePrima told her a concrete barrier similar to an existing barrier along the Thruway in Tonawanda and Amherst, would cost $2 million — a price that isn’t feasible for the project, he said, suggesting a 10-foot wooden barrier, which would be more attractive, but not as effective in blocking sound from passing trucks and cars.

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